Lassie Come-Home

Lassie is Joe’s prize collie and constant companion. But when Joe’s father loses his job, Lassie must be sold. Three times she escapes from her new owner, and three times she returns home to Joe, until finally she is taken to the remotest part of Scotland—too far a journey for any dog to make alone. But Lassie is not just any dog. First published in 1940, Lassie Come-Home has become one of the best-loved dog stories in the world.

IT

IT is a 1986 horror novel by author Stephen King dealing with seven children being terrorized by a malevolent monster known only as "IT". Featuring a nonlinear narrative, the novel alternates between two different time periods and shifts in relating each perspective as seen through the eyes of those seven protagonists. IT deals with the power of memory, childhood trauma and the ugliness lurking behind a small-town facade. Publishers Weekly listed IT as the best-selling book in America in 1986.

Are You There Vodka?
It's Me, Chelsea

The comedienne star of the Chelsea Handler Show describes her experiences with misbegotten boyfriends, her eccentric mixed-religion parents, and the working world, a lifetime marked by numerous inebriated misadventures.

THE DA VINCI CODE

Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon receives an urgent late-night phone call: The elderly curator of the Louvre has been murdered inside the museum. Near the body, police find a baffling cipher. While working to solve the enigmatic riddle, Langdon discovers it leads to a trail of clues hidden in the works of Da Vinci that were ingeniously disguised by the painter. THE DA VINCI CODE heralds the arrival of a new breed of lightning-paced, intelligent thriller...utterly unpredictable right up to its stunning conclusion.

Nineteen Minutes

In nineteen minutes, you can mow the front lawn, color your hair, watch a third of a hockey game. In nineteen minutes, you can bake scones or get a tooth filled by a dentist; you can fold laundry for a family of five....In nineteen minutes, you can stop the world, or you can just jump off it. In nineteen minutes, you can get revenge. Nineteen Minutes by New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult asks simple questions that have no easy answers: Can your own child become a mystery to you? What does it mean to be different in our society? Is it ever okay for a victim to strike back? And who, if anyone, has the right to judge someone else?

The Stranger

One of the most famous French novels of the twentieth century, The Stranger is an existential novel ramked among the most notable literary expositions of the absurdity of human existence in an indifferent universe. While The Stranger appears extremely simple and a carefully planned written book, it contains a reality that creates a rich, full of meaning for the reader.

Gone with The Wind

This romantic drama and only novel written by Margaret Mitchell is set in Jonesboro and Atlanta, Georgia during the American Civil War and Reconstruction. The plot line follows the life of mythological archetype Scarlett O'Hara and its treatment of symbolism is one of the most analyzed in literature. Time magazine included the novel in its 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005.

The War of the Worlds

While The War of the Worlds is a work of fiction, much of its setting and premise was grounded in scientific ideas and surprisingly at the time of publication it was sub classed a romance. The novel has influenced much literature and other media, spawning several films, radio dramas, comic book adaptations, a television series, and parallel accounts written by a host of authors.

Little Women

Little Women (or Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy) by American author Louisa May Alcott is a novel that follows the lives of four sisters — Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy March, and is loosely based on the author's childhood experiences with her three sisters. The first part of the book was an immediate commercial and critical success and prompted the composition of a second part before being published as a single volume in 1880.

Animal Farm

Time Magazine chose Animal Farm as one of the 100 best English-language novels (1923 to 2005), placing it at number 31 on the Modern Library List of Best 20th-Century Novels. The dystopian novel by George Orwell published in England on 17 August 1945 has also been included in the Great Books of the Western World, winning a Retrospective Hugo Award in 1996.

The Catcher in the Rye

The Catcher in the Rye has been listed as one of the best novels of the 20th century. For The New York Times, Nash K. Burger called it "an unusually brilliant novel" while in 1998 the BBC's Finlo Rohrer wrote, '...58 years since publication, the book is still regarded "as the defining work on what it is like to be a teenager who at various times is disaffected, disgruntled, alienated, isolated, directionless, and sarcastic."

Don Quixote

Don Quixote, fully titled El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha ("The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha") is a novel written by Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes. Cervantes created a fictional origin for the story based upon a manuscript by the invented Moorish historian, Cide Hamete Benengeli. Published in two volumes a decade apart, Don Quixote is the most influential work of literature to emerge from the Spanish Golden Age and entire Spanish literary canon. As a founding work of modern Western literature, it appears regularly on lists that cite the greatest works of fiction.

Frankenstein

Mary Shelley who started writing Frankenstein when she was 18 and finished when she was 19 and her story has had an influence across literature and spawned a complete genre of horror stories and films. Frankenstein is often considered the first fully realized science fiction novel due to its pointed focus on creating life from dead flesh.

Anna Karenina

Though widely regarded as the pinnacle in realist fiction, some Russian critics dismissed the novel as a "trifling romance of high life". Fyodor Dostoevsky however declared it "flawless as a work of art", an opinion shared by Vladimir Nabokov, who admired "the flawless magic of Tolstoy's style" and motif of the moving train subtly introduced and returning in subsequent chapters that herald the novel's majestic finale.

The Red Badge of Courage

The 1895 war novel, The Red Badge of Courage by American author Stephen Crane is considered one of the most influential works in American literature. The story revolves around a young recruit in the American Civil War who is faced by the cruelty of war. The novel made Crane an international success who despite not being born until after the war is credited with establishing the benchmark relating to how Realism can be portrayed.

Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontë's only novel, first published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell. The name of the novel comes from the Yorkshire manor on the moors as the story locale (where as an adjective, Wuthering is a Yorkshire word that refers to turbulent weather). This is reflected in how the narrative depicts the all-encompassing passion between Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw that is ultimately subdued and thwarted so that it eventually destroys the pair.

Murder on the Orient Express

Just after midnight, a snowdrift stopped the Orient Ecpress in its tracks. The luxurious train was surprisingly full for that time of year, but by the morning there was one passenger fewer. An American lay dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside. Red herrings galore are put in the path of Hercule Poirot to try to keep him off the scent, but in dramatic denouement he succeeds by coming up with not just one, but two solutions to the crime.

Jaws

Jaws, the 1974 novel by Peter Benchley depicts the story of a great white shark that preys upon a tourist resort, and the voyage of three men to kill it. The thriller that became a best-seller was adapted into a film directed by Steven Spielberg and has to date sold 25 million copies worldwide.

While some are timeless and others primarily encompass an era, each book listing in this title sequence has "classic" indelibly stamped upon it as a specific trait that inexorably binds them all underneath that banner.

Lassie Come-Home

 

IT

 

Are You There, Vodka? It's Me, Chelsea

 

The Da Vinci Code

 

Nineteen Minutes

 

The Stranger

 

Gone With the Wind

 

The War of the Worlds

 

Little Women

 

Animal Farm

 

The Catcher in the Rye

 

Don Quixote

 

Frankenstein

 

Anna Karenina

 

The Red Badge of Courage

 

Wuthering Heights

 

Murder on the Orient Express

 

Jaws